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Thank You and You're Welcome

Mark Complete

One of the things that makes a Filipino is having the ability to feel gratefulness in whatever comes their way. They would be thankful for any situation they may be put in whether for the assistance and presents given to them, for family and friendships, and even for difficulties that they encounter in life (thinking that these challenges mean a better life later on). It doesn’t mean that their gratitude is not genuine. In fact, it is always pure and sincere.

Maraming salamat / Salamat

"Maraming salamat” is a phrase that is used to express gratitude. Marami means “a lot” or “very much”. While salamat means “thanks”. The phrase can be directly translated as “Thank you very much.” For everyday conversations, Filipinos would just say "salamat”. This is acceptable in casual events such as buying from a store or having your food served in a restaurant. Whereas in formal occasions or in official documents and memos, maraming salamat would be more fitting.
Markup
Examples:
Thanks
Salamat Play audio #1922
Thanks, sir/madam
Salamat pô Play audio #1921
Thank you very much
Maraming salamat Play audio #1920
Thank you very much, sir/madam
Maraming salamat pô Play audio #1919
Markup
Examples:
Thanks
Salamat Play audio #1922
Thanks, sir/madam
Salamat po Play audio #1921
Thank you very much
Maraming salamat Play audio #1920
Thank you very much, sir/madam
Maraming salamat po Play audio #1919
Waláng anumán

You can acknowledge the gratitude that is shown by saying “Waláng anumán.” The Filipino word walá literally means “nothing”. Anumán means “anything”. The expression can be literally translated as “it’s nothing”. Contextually, the expression is also accepted as “you’re welcome.”
Markup
Examples:
It’s nothing / You’re welcome
Waláng anumán Play audio #1924
It’s nothing, sir/madam /
You’re welcome, sir/madam
Waláng anumán pô Play audio #1923
Markup
Examples:
It’s nothing / You’re welcome
Walang anuman Play audio #1924
It’s nothing, sir/madam /
You’re welcome, sir/madam
Walang anuman po Play audio #1923
Let's see how these expressions are used.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Jane receives a birthday gift from Joe.

Jane: Thanks, Joe.

Joe: You’re welcome!



Jane: Salamat, Joe. Play audio #1981

Joe: Waláng anumán. Play audio #1924
Scenario: Joe receives his food from the cashier.

Cashier: Here’s your order, sir.

Joe: Thanks!

Cashier: You’re welcome.



Cashier: Heto na pó ang or``der niyó, sir. Play audio #1982

Joe: Salamat! Play audio #1922

Cashier: Waláng anumán. Play audio #1983
Scenario: Jane writes a letter of appreciation for everyone who attended their wedding.

Jane: Thank you very much for attending our wedding.




Jane: Maraming salamat sa pagdaló sa aming kasál. Play audio #1980
Scenario: After the election, the mayor thanks everyone for their support.

Mayor: Thank you very much for the support



Mayor: Maraming salamat po sa suporta. Play audio #1925
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Jane receives a birthday gift from Joe.

Jane: Thanks, Joe.

Joe: You’re welcome!



Jane: Salamat, Joe. Play audio #1981

Joe: Walang anuman. Play audio #1924
Scenario: Joe receives his food from the cashier.

Cashier: Here’s your order, sir.

Joe: Thanks!

Cashier: You’re welcome.



Cashier: Heto na po ang order niyo, sir. Play audio #1982

Joe: Salamat! Play audio #1922

Cashier: Walang anuman. Play audio #1983
Scenario: Jane writes a letter of appreciation for everyone who attended their wedding.

Jane: Thank you very much for attending our wedding.




Jane: Maraming salamat sa pagdalo sa aming kasal. Play audio #1980
Scenario: After the election, the mayor thanks everyone for their support.

Mayor: Thank you very much for the support



Mayor: Maraming salamat po sa suporta. Play audio #1925
In some situations, “Salamat din (pô)```” is used instead of waláng anumán. It means “Thanks, too.” Similar to waláng anumán, this expression is a way of acknowledging the gratitude shown to you, but at the same time, conveying that you are thankful for a person or for the act one has done.
Markup
Examples:
Thanks, too
Salamat din Play audio #1926
Thanks, too, sir/madam
Salamat din pô Play audio #1927
Markup
Examples:
Thanks, too
Salamat din Play audio #1926
Thanks, too, sir/madam
Salamat din po Play audio #1927
See these expressions of gratitude in use in particular scenarios and daily occasions.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Jane picks up her clothes from the laundry shop.

Jane: Thanks.

Cashier: Thanks, too, ma’am.



Jane: Salamat. Play audio #1930

Cashier: Salamát din pô. Play audio #1927
Scenario: Joe leaves the restaurant after eating.

Waitress: Thank you, sir. Please come again.

Joe: Thanks, too.



Waitress: Salamat pó. Balík pó kayó. Play audio #1978

Joe: Salamat din. Play audio #1926
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Jane picks up her clothes from the laundry shop.

Jane: Thanks.

Cashier: Thanks, too, ma’am.



Jane: Salamat. Play audio #1930

Cashier: Salamat din po. Play audio #1927
Scenario: Joe leaves the restaurant after eating.

Waitress: Thank you, sir. Please come again.

Joe: Thanks, too.



Waitress: Salamat po. Balik po kayo. Play audio #1978

Joe: Salamat din. Play audio #1926
Lesson Summary:
Filipino phrases of gratitude are frequently used in many situations. Expressing gratefulness for almost anything is one observable characteristic of Filipinos. Showing appreciation through these simple terms shows good manners as well.


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Next: Expressions of Gratitude Transcription Drill

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Common Expressions


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