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Question: am I correct to suggest that natulog or nagtulog is th

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Author Photo by: Fujishooter
Mar 21 2020, 11:52pm CST ~ 3 mos., 22 days ago. 
Question: am I correct to suggest that natulog or nagtulog is the past tense for sleep? When I ask my wife how to say “how was your sleep?”, her response is “kamusta ang tulog mo?” I trust her of course but am a little confused as I expected to have some conjugation of past tense associated with the verb word “tulog”.
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Mar 22 2020, 12:22am CST ~ 3 mos., 22 days ago. 
Natulog is the completed aspect of sleep.
 
Kumusta ang tulog mo is fine. There isn't really a verb in that sentence.
 
Kumusta ang tulog mo
(how is/was) (focus marker) (sleep, noun) (of you, genetive 2nd p singular pronoun)
 
Even in English we say "how was your sleep". Sleep here is also a noun.
 
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Author Photo Fujishooter
Mar 23 2020, 2:19am CST ~ 3 mos., 21 days ago. 
@akosikoneho Aha, makes sense. Maraming salamat po.
 
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Author Photo JohnD
Mar 23 2020, 9:07am CST ~ 3 mos., 21 days ago. 
From my very limited knowledge, one of the joys of Tagalog is that you can put mag in front of virtually anything to make it a verb and ang in front of pretty much any verb root to make it a noun. Gross generalisation I know.
Sleep is rarely used as a noun in English though, I think. Normally we would ask How did you sleep? or Did you sleep well? Both verbs. Sleep as a noun is usually 'deep' English. My sleep was interrupted by... or Lack of sleep is responsible for...
 
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Badge: AdminBadge: SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Mar 23 2020, 11:44am CST ~ 3 mos., 21 days ago. 
From my very limited knowledge, one of the joys of Tagalog is that you can put mag in front of virtually anything to make it a verb and ang in front of pretty much any verb root to make it a noun. Gross generalisation I know.
 
@JohnD That's a good shortcut where at least you'll be understandable...of course, it will often be bad grammar...but not always! ; )
 
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Author Photo JohnD
Mar 23 2020, 8:25pm CST ~ 3 mos., 20 days ago. 
@TLDCAdmin I remember my wife once being asked what our son ate for breakfast. 'Magcereal siya' was her reply
 
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Author Photo Minette747
Mar 25 2020, 2:21pm CST ~ 3 mos., 18 days ago. 
Question: am I correct to suggest that natulog or nagtulog is the past tense for sleep? When I ask my wife how to say “how was your sleep?”, her response is “kamusta ang tulog mo?” I trust her of course but am a little confused as I expected to have some conjugation of past tense associated with the verb word “tulog”.
 
@Fujishooter
 
- Natulog is the past tense of sleep. Nagtulog is used in the following; “Nagtulog lang ako maghapon.” (I just slept all day) The proper response for your question, like in English, should be,”Okay naman,” or “Nakatulog ako ng mahimbing (I slept well).” Notice the prefix /naka-/ in “nakatulog.” It is always joined with a verb or adjective to state a condition. The response to her question can be what I said earlier or the following: “Hindi ako nakatulog ng mabuti (I didn’t sleep well)” or, “Mabuti naman (It was good).”
 
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Author Photo Fujishooter
Mar 26 2020, 8:10pm CST ~ 3 mos., 17 days ago. 
@Minette747 Maraming Salamat
 
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Author Photo Minette747
Mar 26 2020, 9:31pm CST ~ 3 mos., 17 days ago. 
@Fujishooter Walang anuman. Nawa’y nakatulong. (Hopefully it helps.)
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Mar 27 2020, 6:56am CST ~ 3 mos., 17 days ago. 
@JohnD Possibly "nag-cereal".
 
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Author Photo JohnD
Mar 27 2020, 5:22pm CST ~ 3 mos., 16 days ago. 
@akosikoneho I think the question was posed as to what he ate on a regular basis rather than what he ate that morning. So I think that mag would be correct. But I appreciate that it would be be nag for the past tense if the question referred to a specific instance in the past.
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Mar 28 2020, 12:27am CST ~ 3 mos., 16 days ago. 
@JohnD
"I remember my wife once being asked what our son ate for breakfast. 'Magcereal siya' was her reply"
 
" I think the question was posed as to what he ate on a regular basis rather than what he ate that morning. So I think that mag would be correct. But I appreciate that it would be be nag for the past tense if the question referred to a specific instance in the past."
 
In that case it would be nag-se-cereal siya. Nag-ro-root is used for habitual actions usually.
 
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Author Photo AMBoy Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Mar 28 2020, 2:36am CST ~ 3 mos., 16 days ago. 
Habitual actions usually take the present tense (actually aspect, not tense) as stated by AkoSiKoneho who one of our resident experts. But for examples sake, and my own learning, I will expand on this with what I believe are the possible formations:
 
magcereal = to eat cereal
magceceral = will eat cereal (in the future)
nagceceral = eating cereal (currently) OR habitually eats cereal
nagcereal = ate cereal (in the past)
 
nagcecereal siya = He/she is eating cereal (right now) or He/she eats cereal (regularly)
 
See here:
learningtagalog.com/ grammar/verbs/aspect s/overview.html
 
It's a very interesting language indeed.
 
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Author Photo JohnD
Mar 28 2020, 2:49am CST ~ 3 mos., 16 days ago. 
@akosikoneho Thank you. I (mistakenly) thought that you would use the infinitive in this case. Always something new to learn
 
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