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Question: Pronunciation of ‘k’. I’ve noticed that Filipino

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Author Photo by: Buffes
Jan 26 2021, 3:49am CST ~ 1 mo., 10 days ago. 
Question: Pronunciation of ‘k’. I’ve noticed that Filipinos I hear, including the sound examples on this website, sometimes don’t pronounce the letter ‘k’ hard as in English, but soft, with a sound I don’t think is common in English, but corresponds to the Swedish ‘sj’ and ‘sk’ (kind of like an English ‘sh’, but further back in the mouth). For example, in the sound samples of this lesson, the ‘k’ is soft when they say “Okey naman” and the last ‘k’ in “kumusta ka”, but hard when they say ikaw: www.tagalog.com/less ons/lesson.php?lesso n_id=31&csid=49
 
I couldn’t find this mentioned in the lesson about pronunciation. Maybe it’s only a regional dialect? It seems to happen more when preceded by open vowels (e.g. ‘a’, ‘o’) than by closed vowels, but I’m not sure.
 
Does anyone have more knowledge on this?
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP SupporterOfficial Tagalog.com Teacher Teacher
Jan 26 2021, 6:11am CST ~ 1 mo., 10 days ago. 
To quote wikipedia, "/k/ has a tendency to become [kx] word-initially. Intervocalic /k/ tends to become [x], as in bakit ('why') or takot ('fear')."
 
It isn't the sj sound in standard Swedish, but it can sound like the sj sound in some varieties of swedish (immigrant swedish in particular).
 
commons.wikimedia.or g/w/index.php?title= File%3ASv-sj-sound_i n_five_variants
 
The sound spelled <x> in ipa is made where you make the /k/ sound, but then blowing through a gap in your mouth at the velum.
 
www.youtube.com/watc h?app=desktop&v=euRb mOchIXE
 
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Author Photo Buffes
Jan 27 2021, 10:48am CST ~ 1 mo., 9 days ago. 
@akosikoneho Thank you for the info! I was unaware of this shift of k, as I don’t know of it’s presence in Swedish or English (the languages I know best), but it does make sense when you think about the mouth and tongue movements. The pronunciation of the Swedish sj, skj, sk, etc. differs quite a lot depending on dialect and sociolect, but it was the closest association I made.
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP SupporterOfficial Tagalog.com Teacher Teacher
Jan 27 2021, 10:52am CST ~ 1 mo., 9 days ago. 
@Buffes No problem, its closest to the realization(s) commonly heard in the "Rinkebysvenska" dialect in my opinion, but its probably best to un-associate the sound with any one swedish sound. Good luck!
 
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