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Question: regarding the ‘k’ sound.

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Author Photo by: Diegocorry Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious Supporter
Jul 07 2020, 12:27pm CST ~ 1 mo., 6 days ago. 
At times I hear it pronounced almost like a guttural German ‘ch’, and at times so softly one can barely hear it. My question: is this a regional difference or is something else going on? Many thanks.
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Author Photo jkos Badge: AdminBadge: SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Jul 07 2020, 1:00pm CST ~ 1 mo., 6 days ago. 
At times I hear it pronounced almost like a guttural German ‘ch’, and at times so softly one can barely hear it. My question: is this a regional difference or is something else going on? Many thanks.
 
@Diegocorry
Absolutely true! I think some places do pronounce the K's more gutturally than others, and the sound made often depends on the location of the "k" in the word.
 
I made a post about this ~ 2 years ago, too:
www.tagalog.com/mess age_board/view_messa ge.php?p=7194
...two native speakers responded there as well.
 
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Author Photo Diegocorry Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious Supporter
Jul 07 2020, 1:06pm CST ~ 1 mo., 6 days ago. 
@jkos Interesting parallel: ‘gonna’ vs. ‘going to’. Thanks.
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Jul 07 2020, 8:02pm CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
K in between two vowels is very much like a german "ch" sound. Some speakers go so far as to say "kch" which is more akin to the famous Swiss german "ch" sound. It is similar to Americans, Canadians, and Australians saying "budder" for "butter".
 
It is a well known allophone of /k/ in tagalog. The ipa for the "kch or ch" sounds would be [kx] and [x] respectively. The wikipage on Tagalog phonology can tell you more.
 
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Author Photo lonewolfandpup
Jul 13 2020, 1:58am CST ~ 1 mo., 0 days ago. 
K is pronounced without so much breath (idk how to explain it)
Like, it doesn't sound too crisp? Maybe more on the gluttural?
 
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Author Photo Toni
Jul 14 2020, 8:56am CST ~ 4 weeks ago. 
The trick is to listen, listen, listen to native speakers. Your brain will get the hang of it that way regarding the elusive k sound. May I add that you must repeat, repeat, repeat until your speech apparatus...teeth, tongue, lips, nose, facial muscles...finally do it right!
 
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Author Photo borr
Jul 16 2020, 2:42pm CST ~ 3 weeks, 6 days ago. 
I heard many of my family members alternate between hard and soft K's regardless of region. I personally do the same. I tend to make my K's softer, sometimes almost "invisible" like the example when speaking fast and/or in a lower voice. And when I'm speaking slower and/or louder I usually use harder K's.
 
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Author Photo Toni
Jul 16 2020, 4:32pm CST ~ 3 weeks, 5 days ago. 
@borr
 
Thank you! That is very helpful. Toni
 
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