Back
Close
 

Question: Upon meeting a person, often I (think I) hear *"Kumu

« Back
123»
Message Menu
Author Photo by: Sometimes
Sep 18 2020, 5:52pm CST ~ 1 mo., 6 days ago. 
Question: Upon meeting a person, often I (think I) hear *"Kumu staka?"* How is it written? What is the answer?
Reply
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
Sep 18 2020, 7:53pm CST ~ 1 mo., 6 days ago. 
The answer is the same answer when someone asks you "how are you?" or "wassup"?
 
Message Menu
Author Photo BoraMac Badge: Supporter
Sep 18 2020, 7:58pm CST ~ 1 mo., 6 days ago. 
kumusta ka...with kumusta acting as the Tagalog phonetic translation of como estas from the Spanish era and ka is you in Tagalog.
 
The most common answer is probably "Mas mabuti" Very well.
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 19 2020, 8:55am CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
@BoraMac Thank you very much!
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 19 2020, 8:57am CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
Removed by Author
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
Sep 19 2020, 2:56pm CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
@BoraMac mas mabuti isn't very well. "Mas mabuti" often translates to better. Very well is mabuting-mabuti
 
Mabuti naman or okay lang is often the answer to kumusta
 
Mas ma
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 19 2020, 3:56pm CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
@BoraMac Like in Spanish, in Italian (I use the Spanish version of my Italian name whenever I can) there are two verbs for *to be*, the present tense goes as follows - personal pronouns in brackets, they are used only when needed to add stress:
(io) sono / sto
(tu) sei / stai: Come stai?
(lui) è / sta
(noi) siamo / stiamo
(voi) siete / state
(loro) sono / stanno
 
(0) I could not find it elsewhere on the site and hope it is ok to ask here:
(1) Is there a distinct verb for to be in Tagalog? From the very little Indonesian that I know (I dare guess it is a sister language) in Indonesian there is not: kumusta ka? is apa kabar?
What is this? is Apa ini?
(2) In case there is, could you - or anyone willing to do so - write it out for me? It would be the ideal occasion to "meet" both the Tagalog personal pronouns and the verb from which I like to start any new language.
Many thanks in advance!
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
Sep 19 2020, 11:02pm CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
Tagalog has no to be verb. Verbs in Tagalog aren't the way they are in Indo-European languages.
 
As a primer, a chart of Tagalog verbs: www.seasite.niu.edu/ tagalog/tagalog_verb s.htm
 
Kumusta is literally derived from cómo está but it does not mean it follows Spanish grammar.
 
A primer for Tagalog grammar: www.seasite.niu.edu/ tagalog/Grammar%20Ac tivities/Grammar%20D efault%20Files/
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 19 2020, 11:06pm CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
@Bituingmaykinang Thanks a lot!
What time is it in the Philippines? It is 6 a.m. here in Italy. I just sent an email to California and thought the alert informed me the answer had already come in ☺️.
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 19 2020, 11:07pm CST ~ 1 mo., 5 days ago. 
Removed by Author
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Aiza Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Sep 22 2020, 3:06am CST ~ 1 mo., 2 days ago. 
Removed by Author
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 22 2020, 3:14am CST ~ 1 mo., 2 days ago. 
@Aiza Selamat!
So, ako is *not* I, the first person singular?
I am asking, because in Indonesian *aku* means I and
*dia* is the third person singular: he/she.
In Europe you can see that words derived from the same Latin word, in Spanish / Italian / French have taken on very different meanings, very much in the same way ... ☺️.
 
I see you have edited your question while I was editing mine.
I still do not know how to say I, you, et cetera in Tagalog ... 😢.
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Aiza Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Sep 22 2020, 3:22am CST ~ 1 mo., 2 days ago. 
@Sometimes hi
Its Salamat not selamat
Well, here in Philippines "Ako" means "I"
When we say he/she it is a singular form.
Like for example, she is beautiful.
In tagalog it says, Siya ay maganda.
 
Another example,
I am filipino. In tagalog it says "Ako ay isang pilipino.
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Sometimes
Sep 22 2020, 3:31am CST ~ 1 mo., 2 days ago. 
Thanks for the info and for pointing out the first a in Salamat (Selamat with e is very much part of me...😁)
I dare to guess that *siya* and dia have a same ancestor. (I did some courses in Semitic languages - Hebrew, Aramaic, Arabic (which was the toughest). There you see similar changes.)
Examples are very useful to someone like me who has to learn from scratch. Salamat.
Do I understand correctly that *isang* means human being?
In Indonesian "saya *orang* Jawa" means "I am Javanese" (someone from the island Java).
 
Message Menu
Author Photo NikNak
Sep 22 2020, 4:56am CST ~ 1 mo., 2 days ago. 
Hi ... isang means "isa + ng" so "isang tao" means "one person" or can mean "a person"
 
Isa means "one"
So " isa ng tao " becomes "isang tao"
 
"Isang kuting" means "one kitten".
 
Maybe "isang" can mean "one person" and the "tao" can be dropped. I don't think so, as I have not seen this anywhere that I remember. However, there are lot's of shortcuts I still don't know.
 
Message Menu
Author Photo Aiza Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Sep 22 2020, 5:05am CST ~ 1 mo., 2 days ago. 
Yes that's right
 
123»
Post a Reply»




« Back to Main Page
Views: 999

Search DictionaryDCTNRY TDC Corpus ToolCORPUS
Become a patron
We love our supporters! :)
© copyright 2020. Do not reproduce content or audio without prior written authorization. We put a lot of hard work and TLC into this website -- please don't copy our content without permission.