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"Short ng" contraction

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Author Photo by: Jimmy329
Aug 01 2022, 7:33am CST ~ 2 weeks, 3 days ago. 
"Short ng" contraction
 
To my best knowledge the short "ng" has several meanings:
 
1. "ng" can serve as a linker between adjectives and nouns (in general: modifier and modified word) ... the base is "na" and "ng" ... according to whether the linker ends with a vowel (+ng), with "n" (+g) or else (na) - ng is always contracted (e.g. magandang babae)
 
2. "ng" can be the counterpart of the English "of" or the "saxon genetive" (eg. presyo ng bilihin) - obviously this "ng" is not contracted.
 
3. '"ng" can be a connector between a verb and an object, that receives the action (e.g. nanood ng TV) - this "ng" is not contracted either ...
 
4. "ng" can be a linker between a personal pronoun and an infinitive verb (e.g. gusto kong kumain ng pancit) - this is contracted. But as far as I understand, sometimes the "ng" is simply omitted !
 
5 "ng" can be a linker between a personal pronoun and a noun (gusto ko ng aso) - so it is not contracted.
 
Is this list of "ng" versions complete ?
 
How about the general rules for contraction ? "ng" is contracted, when it is a linker, unless it is a linker between a personal pronoun and a noun ?
 
This is the list of rules that I personally made up. So I am not sure, whether these rules are correct ! I hope that some grammar guro can give me a good clue ! I am always in doubt, when I have to use "ko ng" or "kong", "mo ng" or "mong" etc.
 
Kind regards
Jimmy
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Aug 05 2022, 7:46am CST ~ 1 week, 6 days ago. 
@Jimmy329
 
I’m not sure about what you meant by “short ng”. Is “ng” the short one and “nang” the long one? If so, then the confusion might happen only when they are spoken because they sound the same. However, when written they are unrelated.
 
The following is about your Nos. 2 and 3 in the list:
“Ng” is a preposition that translates to “of” most of the time. It may also serve as the indicator of the object of a verb.
 
Laruán NG bata = toy OF a child
Alas singko NG umaga = 5 o’clock IN the morning
Unang araw NG buwán = first day OF the month
Uminóm siya NG kapé = He/She drank coffee. (drank what? = object)
 
“Nang” is the adverb “when”; is used to form an adverb; is used as a conjunction; is used when an action is repeated.
 
Gabí na NANG umalís silá = It was already evening WHEN they left.
Lumalakad siyá NANG mabagal = He/She is walking slowLY.
Uminóm ka ng kapé NANG (or “para”) hindí ka antukín. = Drink coffee SO THAT you won’t feel sleepy.
Iyák NANG iyák ang bata. = The child KEEPS ON crying.
Bakit tulog ka lang NANG tulog kahit maraming mga bagay ka pang kailangang gawín? = Why do you just KEEP ON sleeping even when there are a lot of things that you still need to do?
 
With regard to the meanings you listed, what you are describing in No. 1 is the linker “na” and not the preposition “ng”.
 
No. 1: < “Na” can serve as a linker between adjectives and nouns (in general: modifier and modified word).> In almost all cases, the modifier and the modified word are interchangeable as long as “na” remains between them.
 
itím NA sapatos = sapatos NA itim = black shoes
papél NA punít = punit NA papel = torn paper
 
When the word before “na” ends in a consonant, except the letter “n”, the “na” stays between the words as is. (The example above illustrates that).
 
When the word before “na” ends in “n”, the “na” may be attached as the letter “g” to the end of that word.
 
ibon NA luntian = ibonG luntian = green bird
luntian NA ibon = luntianG ibon = green bird
hipon NA malakí = hiponG malaki = big shrimp
malaki NA hipon = malakíNG hipon = big shrimp
 
When the word before “na” ends in a vowel, the “na” may be attached as the letter “ng” to the end of that word.
 
kabayo NA putî = kabayoNG putî = white horse
puti NA kabayo = putíNG kabayo = white horse
payát NA batà = skinny child
bata NA payat = bataNG payat = skinny child
 
2. and 3. were covered above.
 
4. <"ng" can be a linker between a personal pronoun and an infinitive verb (e.g. gusto kong kumain ng pancit) - this is contracted. But as far as I understand, sometimes the "ng" is simply omitted !> - No. It’s not “ng”, it’s “na” that you’re describing here. Please look at my post under the post of jeffkrauss regarding sneezing. I explained the case of having 2 verbs in a sentence. Your “gusto kong kumain” is another example of having 2 verbs – like and eat. The linker is “na”.)
 
5 <"ng" can be a linker between a personal pronoun and a noun (gusto ko ng aso) - so it is not contracted.> - “Ng” is indicating the object (aso/dog) of the verb (gusto/like)
 
<How about the general rules for contraction ? "ng" is contracted, when it is a linker, unless it is a linker between a personal pronoun and a noun ?> - Given the explanations I have given above, do you still think it’s a matter of contracting “ng”?
 
<I am always in doubt, when I have to use "ko ng" or "kong", "mo ng" or "mong" etc.> - “Ko ng” and “mo ng” are personal pronouns followed by the preposition “ng”.
“Kong” and “mong” are “ko na” and “mo na” ("na" is the linker "that/which/who is") merged based on the explanation I gave under your No. 1, i.e., when the preceding word ends in a vowel, the linker “na” may be attached to the previous word as “ng”.
 
BTW, I said that the " 'na' may be attached ” because although we customarily do so, it is not wrong to leave it unattached.
 
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Author Photo Jimmy329
Aug 05 2022, 1:07pm CST ~ 1 week, 6 days ago. 
The terms "short NG" and "long NANG" are used in grammar books. They are pronounced the same .... but their meaning is different.
 
As I have pointed out, my question relates to the "short NG" only. I want to know, when the "short NG" is contracted and when it is not contracted.
 
I have to analyse your posting as far as this is concerned ... this may take while. Thanks for your efforts so far !
 
Have a nice evening
Jimmy
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
Aug 05 2022, 7:10pm CST ~ 1 week, 6 days ago. 
-ng and ng the unfocused marker are two different things
 
It may help not thinking of -ng and ng as "short ng".
 
-ng is usually a replacement for "na" after an adjective or pronouns, and I believe adverbs too
 
MagandaNG dilag (Maganda na dilag). This is the -ng
 
Kinain NG bata ang isda. This is the unfocused marker.
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Aug 05 2022, 11:25pm CST ~ 1 week, 6 days ago. 
@Bituingmaykinang
 
It’s good that you gave this example:
Kinain NG bata ang isdâ.
 
My explanation about “ng” as an indicator of the verb’s OBJECT is only true with AF verbs. Your example above used “kinain”, which is an OF verb and where the verb’s object is the subject of the sentence. With OF verbs, it is the “ang” that indicates the common-noun object-subject and the “ng” indicates the ACTOR of the verb.
 
-ng is usually a replacement for "na" after an adjective or pronouns, and I believe adverbs too
 
About that “... and I believe adverbs too”.
 
I know what you meant by “... adverbs too”, but I did bring it up with Jimmy*** because it might just confuse him even more. I only talked about "na" as used in modifying nouns and not verbs. But since you brought it up...😉, I better address that now because a part of our comments may seem to be in conflict with regard to the role of “na” and “nang” with adverbs.
 
Using “mabilís na tumakbó” as an example, “na” there does change the adjective “fast” into an adverb – ran fast/quickly. However, when we reverse the words and state that as “tumakbong mabilis”, then that’s when “na” would not be the right linker anymore. Detaching “ng” from “tumakbo” will not be “tumakbo na mabilis”, but “tumakbo NANG mabilis”.
 
Using “na”, we can have:
 
mabilis NA takbo = takbo NA mabilis = takboNG mabilis > “Na” is the linker regardless of the order of the words because the root word “takbo” here is the noun “run” – a quick run.
 
With “nang” it’s:
 
mabilis NA tumakbo = tumakbo NANG mabilis = tumakboNG mabilis > “tumakbo” is a verb – ran fast/quickly
 
So, “na” may create an adverb but only when the adjective comes BEFORE the verb. It is "nang" when the adjective comes AFTER the verb, where it becomes an adverb.
 
Tumakbó tayo, isang takbóng mabilís (takbo NA mabilis) papuntáng McDonald’s. = Let’s run, a quick run to McDonald’s.
 
Tumakbo tayoNG mabilis (tumakbo tayo NANG mabilis) papuntang McDonald’s. = Let’s run quickly to McDonald’s.
 
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Author Photo Jimmy329
Aug 07 2022, 1:15am CST ~ 1 week, 5 days ago. 
Your discussion about the role of "na / nang" as an "adverb maker" reallly helped me a lot ! Maraming salamat to all advice givers ... have a nice Sunday!
 
Kind regards
Jimmy
 
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Author Photo jkos Badge: AdminBadge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
Aug 07 2022, 9:16am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@Jimmy329
“ The terms "short NG" and "long NANG" are used in grammar books”
 
I have a lot of grammar books and I can never recall seeing this. Would be interested in your source.
 
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Author Photo Jimmy329
Aug 08 2022, 1:55am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
This is where I got it from:
 
www.youtube.com/watc h?v=4PZ3m2KTFjk&list =PLH44bf_3JMGqaLpgxN VdVkxL78rkgIUJK
 
The young lady in that video "NG vs. NANG" uses the terms short-NG and long-NANG .... but based on the discussion in here, I tend to believe, that this is NOT "official grammatical terminology". Anyway ... I think it is quite illustrative and so I like to use it in my personal records ...
 
Have a nice day !
Jimmy
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Aug 08 2022, 9:57am CST ~ 1 week, 3 days ago. 
@Jimmy329
 
It all makes sense now.
 
The teacher on YouTube was explaining her visual presentation orally. Since “ng” and “nang” sound exactly the same, in order for her to distinguish one from the other, she had to either spell the word each time or use their comparative lengths (short/long) to do that. In print, however, their spellings automatically take care of that.
 
Since our discussions here are entirely in printed form, when I saw your post for the first time, I was puzzled by your use of "short ng" that's why I had to clarify with you first if the long one would be "nang". I was just making sure that we’re on the same page when I give my comments to your post.
 
So, it's not a matter of grammatical terminology at all, but a case of the difference between the manner of explaining something orally and in print.
 
If I were to explain the use of “ng” and “nang” to someone over the phone, I would be forced to resort to using “short” and “long” too.
 
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Author Photo PinoyTaj Badge: Supporter
Aug 08 2022, 12:03pm CST ~ 1 week, 3 days ago. 
I also see them as short “ng” and long “nang” because that is what they are. Two words that sound the same but one is short and the other is long (when written) albeit they have completely different uses but being able to separate them is a good step in the right direction imo.
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Aug 08 2022, 7:31pm CST ~ 1 week, 3 days ago. 
@PinoyTaj
 
Yes, the importance of knowing which one to use comes into play when you have to write something in Filipino. At times we Filipinos do commit mistakes too. Usually, it's with using "ng" when it should be "nang". In conversations though, there's nothing to worry about.
 
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