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In my course, I just came across what sounds to me like elision

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Author Photo by: pauamma
Aug 15 2022, 5:29am CST ~ 1 mo., 20 days ago. 
In my course, I just came across what sounds to me like elision of word-final* k and allophone of word-final* t, both in unstressed syllables.
 
Specifically:
- pumasok sounds like [pumaːsɔ], not [pumaːsɔk].
- lumusot sounds like [lumusɔɾ], not [lumusɔt].
 
Are these accidental mispronunciations, attested allophones, me mishearing, or something else?
 
* or maybe sentence-final, not sure.
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Author Photo Banagi
Aug 16 2022, 8:41am CST ~ 1 mo., 19 days ago. 
If you heard right, it must be a mistake in-course.
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Aug 16 2022, 9:01am CST ~ 1 mo., 19 days ago. 
@pauamma
 
In case the omission of "k" was intentional, "pumasò" is a Tagalog word that means "to cause a burn (1st degree, at most)". There is also "pumasó" which means "to expire (the validity of something)".
 
I don't know how the " ɾ " really sounds, but "lumuso" is not a valid word in Tagalog.
 
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Author Photo repolyo Badge: Supporter
Aug 16 2022, 9:22am CST ~ 1 mo., 19 days ago. 
@pauamma I'll take a guess this is from LT 17
Bawal pumasok
Bawal lumusót (the final syllable is accented)
The /k/ and /t/ are definitely there in the audio. In Tagalog, /t/ and /k/ are not aspirated which may be what you are perceiving at the end of a phrase.
Let me know if I have misled...
 
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Author Photo pauamma
Aug 16 2022, 6:20pm CST ~ 1 mo., 19 days ago. 
@Juantutri [ɾ] is an allophone of [t] in some English accents. "better" in en.wikipedia.org/wik i/Voiced_dental_and_ alveolar_taps_and_fl aps#Occurrence is an example.
 
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Author Photo pauamma
Aug 16 2022, 7:04pm CST ~ 1 mo., 19 days ago. 
@repolyo
As it happens, yes. LT 17 (which doesn't mention the stress in "lumusot", which I can't hear in there either, but do hear in www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#lumusot).
 
I do hear a consonant at the end of "lumusot" in LT17, but to me that's [ɾ] and not [t]. In www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#lumusot, I'm not sure which I hear, but it sounds closer to [t] than www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#ingat, which sounds definitely like [ɾ] to me. (Different speakers, so again it could be differing accents.) In www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#alat and www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#lungkot, I don't hear any final consonant. (Maybe a [ʔ] in lungkot, not sure.)
 
I hear a faint /k/ in www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#pumasok, and (confusingly, since you mentioned /k/ isn't aspirated and for other words in -k I know I agree) a distinct [kʰ] in www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#pasok and www.tagalog.com/dict ionary/#ipasok.
 
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Author Photo repolyo Badge: Supporter
Aug 16 2022, 7:41pm CST ~ 1 mo., 19 days ago. 
@pauamma According to Essential Tagalog Grammar Appendix A, the authors of LT use their own system of marking stress. Essential Tagalog Grammar Appendix A compares another spelling system with their system (column "system used in this book"). Yes, they explicitly state that "In this book, all syllables with a long vowel are underlined" but long (stressed) ultimate syllables are not underlined as per their Appendix A specifications.
 
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Author Photo pauamma
Aug 20 2022, 7:17am CST ~ 1 mo., 15 days ago. 
@repolyo Hmm. Maybe the marking or lack of marking stress primes me to (not) hear it, then. Thanks.
 
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