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Question: how do you say “I think im improving.” In tagalog?

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Author Photo by: derrechan827
Jun 13 2023, 12:10am CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
Question: how do you say “I think im improving.” In tagalog?
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Author Photo PinoyTaj Badge: Supporter
Jun 14 2023, 6:52pm CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
you dont
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Jun 14 2023, 11:53pm CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
The verb would depend on what one is improving on. If it’s about skill, we often use “humusay (to become more adept)”.
 
“I think” would translate to “Sa isip ko (to my mind)”, which sounds more like a misconception when said in Tagalog. Instead, you may say “Sa palagay ko (In my opinion)” or “Mukhang (It looks like)”.
 
Sa palagáy ko/Mukháng humuhusay na ako.
 
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Author Photo kpagelimbo Badge: Native Tagalog SpeakerOfficial Tagalog.com Teacher Teacher
Jul 05 2023, 5:06am CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
Hello! Either "Mukhang gumagaling na ako" or "Parang gumagaling na ako." (It looks like/ it seems like I'm getting better). Hope this helps.
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Jul 06 2023, 12:31am CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
This is just to explain the difference between using “magalíng” and “mahusay”.
 
Both words may be used to express “being good at something”. So, using “magalíng” in that sentence is also correct, provided it is clear to the listener that you are talking about a skill. Otherwise, it would be understood that you meant recovering from an illness. The root word “galíng” is often associated with wellness, while “husay” is with skill.
 
Note: “Galíng” is not to be confused with “galing (from, come from)”.
 
When to use “magaling” or “mahusay”:
 
Magalíng/Mahusay tumugtóg ng gitara si Anna. = Anna plays the guitar well/very well.
 
Magalíng/Mahusay si Anna. = Anna is good at doing something. - You may use either if it is understood or evident that you are referring to her skill, e.g., it is about her playing the guitar and you have already heard her play it.
 
Magalíng na si Anna. = Anna is already well (healthwise); Anna is already good at doing something.
 
Mahusay na si Anna. = Anna is already good at doing something. (In this and the preceding example, that “something” needs to be made clear for the sentence to make sense.) - As is, it will not likely be understood as referring to her health.
 
Mahusay na ang pakiramdám ni Anna. = (Lit.: The feeling of Anna is already doing good) Anna is already feeling well.
 
“Magalíng na ang pakiramdám ni Anna” – We would not likely say this as it sounds redundant because “pakiramdám” suggests that you are referring to her “health feeling” as “magaling” would, too. It could also mean that “Anna feels that she’s already well (but that may not be true – a case of perception vs. reality)”. So, if she is actually well already, say “Magaling na si Anna”.
 
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Author Photo LuzTolentino Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Jul 07 2023, 1:09am CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
Formally: Sa aking palagay, humuhusay na ako. Informally: Gumagaling na ako. The formal version uses direct localisation of the sentence. However, the informal version uses ‘gumagaling’ from the root word ‘galing’ which typically means ‘recovered [from illness]. The confusing part is that ‘gumagaling’ is a lot more commonly used for ‘getting better’ in general whether it’s ‘getting better from illness’ or ‘getting better in a skill’.
 
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Author Photo Juantutri Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Jul 07 2023, 10:49pm CST ~ 1 year, 1 mo ago. 
Formally: Sa aking palagay, humuhusay na ako. Informally: Gumagaling na ako.
 
@LuzTolentino
Maybe it's not about expressing a sentence formally or informally since we use both “gumágalíng” and “humuhusay” colloquially. Although, in a formal sentence about one’s skill or talent, “husay” is likely to be used as it would be more germane than “galíng”.
 
I agree with you that we use "gumágalíng" a lot more often. It's like using "becoming good" about a lot of things when "becoming proficient/adept/skillful" would have been more accurate.
 
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Author Photo LuzTolentino Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Jul 11 2023, 8:52pm CST ~ 1 year, 0 mos ago. 
^I guess that’s the weird part about Tagalog. I don’t really mind it but I wish we could have explored our vocabularies a bit better. Nevertheless thank you for the clarification!
 
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Author Photo DenC Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Aug 29 2023, 8:24pm CST ~ 10 mos. ago. 
You might encounter “Tingin ko” as well.
It can be used as: “Tingin ko, gumagaling/humuhusay na ako.”
 
“Tingin” (“ng” is read as that of “-ing” in English, e.g. bling) means “look”.
So in the English language, this use equates to “It looks like” and not the verb “to look”.
For example: Answering the question “What do you say?” (pertaining to an idea, e.g. doing something) = “Anong (“ano” combined with “ang”) masasabi mo?”
 
“Tingin ko, iyon nga ang gawin natin.” = “I think we should do that.”
This is used in conversational and casual Tagalog and NOT in formal settings.
 
But technically speaking, it should be used for things that you actually see.
For example: To answer the question “What do you say?” (pertaining to an object/tangible thing) = “Anong (“ano” combined with “ang”) masasabi mo?”
 
You say, “Tingin ko, maayos naman.” = “I think it looks fine.”
 
I hope this helps. Good luck! ^^
 
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Author Photo tAgAbuKID7754 Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Sep 03 2023, 2:50pm CST ~ 10 mos. ago. 
@derrechan827 Hi. you can say..." May pag-unlad naman ako sa aking palagay."
 
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Author Photo DenC Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
Sep 05 2023, 5:31am CST ~ 10 mos. ago. 
@tAgAbuKID7754 I think "pag-unlad" is not the most appropriate to use for this sentence because it is usually used as the "improvement/development" of the status of something instead of someone.
 
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